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Amar'e Stoudemire Is No Longer a Knick

by Photo of Josh Bombart

STAT and the Knicks agreed to a buyout, and he will finish the season with the. Mavericks.

Amar'e Stoudemire Is No Longer a Knick

Editor's Note: I'm sad to see Stoudemire leave. He'll always have a soft spot in my heart for coming to New York when no other free agents would, and he helped turn the Knicks around if only for a brief spell. Definitely an up-and-down tenure, but Stoudemire was a class act while he was a Knick. - Ross

Amar’e Stoudemire has departed from the New York Knicks organization and has landed in Dallas Mavericks. After spending four and a half seasons with Knicks, the former all-star and MVP candidate agreed to a buyout earlier in the week. Stoudemire requested a buyout knowing that he probably would not resign at the end of the season when his contract would end.

Stoudemire signed with the Knicks in the summer of 2010 during what was one of the most star-studded free agency periods in NBA history. Stoudemire inked a 5-year $100 million dollar deal and was thought to be the marquee star that would help to lure other star players to New York.

To start the 2010 season Stoudemire was the franchise player that the Knicks organization and Knicks fans had been desperately waiting for, even if he was a consolation prize compared to LeBron James. Stoudemire, Raymond Felton, and a young supporting cast (Danilo Gallinari, Timofey Mozgov, and Wilson Chandler), made Knicks basketball exiting again and had the team battling for playoff contention. Stoudemire was averaging 24.6 points and 9 rebounds per game, making him an unlikely MVP candidate.

That same season the Knicks made a blockbuster deal with the Denver Nuggets in which they traded their upcoming young talent (Galinari, Chandler, Mosgov), Felton, and a draft pick for Carmelo Anthony and Chauncey Billups. Almost immediately there was a chemistry problem between Anthony and Stoudemire as both players like to operate with the ball on the same places on the court. To make things even worse Stoudemire would be plagued by a series of injuries that would keep him in and out lineup for his full tenure in New York. This season may have been the healthiest for Stoudemire (though he's still missed plenty of time), but the current Knicks are a shell of a team compared to his first three years in New York.

Stoudemire joins a Dallas Mavericks team that is currently in contention for the playoffs and have a veteran playoff experienced roster. Stoudemire is expected to take over the roll that Brandon Wright (Pheonix Suns) had with the Mavs, backing up both Dirk Nowitzki and his former Knicks teammate Tyson Chandler. Stoudemire will be expected to provide a spark off the bench and enhance the Maverick’s second unit. The combination of playing in a pick-and-roll offense with guards Rajon Rondo and Monta Ellis could also prove beneficial for Stoudemire as his best years were when he played with pick and roll point guards like Steve Nash. Stoudemire will now have the opportunity to compete for a championship.

While Stoudemire may not have had the Cinderella story that both he and Knicks fans were looking for, that is not to say that there were some shining moments of hope during his time spent with the Knicks. Stoudemire expressed in a statement that "Although I leave the Knicks with a heavy heart, I wish the organization the best of luck. Once a Knick always a Knick." Here is a look at some Stoudemire’s best moments with the Knicks.

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